Fourth-annual Harlem Fine Arts Show expects more than 60 artists and 25-plus galleries from Soho to South Africa and West Harlem to the West Indies

Work by Woodrow Nash titled “Kaleri Warrior” that will be showcased at the Harlem Fine Arts Show, in Riverside Church from Feb. 7 to 10, 2013.

The four-day exposition at 91 Claremont Ave., running from Thursday
through Sunday, is expected to attract some 14,000 viewers who can
purchase compelling works that will be priced as low as $50 to $100

By / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Lovers of fine African-American art from around the globe are getting an early valentine on Thursday as the nation’s most dazzling collection of classic and contemporary black artwork goes on display in the Gothic grandeur of Riverside Church.

Part arts exhibition, part cultural celebration, part marketing extravaganza, the fourth annual Harlem Fine Arts Show is expected to draw more than 60 artists and 25-plus galleries from Soho to South Africa and West Harlem to the West Indies.

“We’re taking the art to the people and providing cultural nutrition for the entire family!” said Dion Clarke, an avid art collector and founder of the show, which has become a premier showcase for emerging and renown black artists.

“Just as Count Basie brought together the greatest musicians of his time, the Harlem Fine Arts Show is bringing together the greatest masters of Afro-centric, Afro-Carribean and African-Diasporic art.”

The four-day exposition at 91 Claremont Ave., running from Thursday through Sunday, is expected to attract some 14,000 viewers who can purchase compelling works that will be priced as low as $50 to $100 and as high as $30,000 to $50,000.

The show kicks off at 6 p.m. Thursday with a gala opening night reception — costing $75 and including food, music and an open bar — honoring the late legendary power broker and former Manhattan Borough President Percy Sutton.

“People think of him as a pioneer in politics, business and the civil rights movement, but he was also an art collector and a man of great passion for the performing and visual arts,” said granddaughter Keisha Sutton-James, the chair of the opening night Salute to Sutton.

Among the prominent artists who will be on hand along with their works:
* Michael Escoffery, the Jamaica-born painter famed for his provocative sexual imagery and portraits.
* Edwin Lester, the self-taught Philadelphia artist known for atmospheric paintings dealing with Biblical creationism and the role of God in the union of men and women.
* Woodrow Nash, the Akron, Ohio-born sculptor who uses stoneware, earthenware, porcelain and terracotta to create a unique style known as “African Nouveau.”
* Ernani Silva, the Brazilian painter who creates vibrant, funny, mystical, satirical and religious works with canvas, wood, paper, glass and zinc.

Students and teachers are admitted for free on Friday between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m., when they’ll be able to meet dozens of artists, take art tours and attend theatrical performances.

Tickets cost $20 for each day or $50 for a three-day weekend pass.

dfeiden@nydailynews.com

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